Dating and friends

For 50-plus types unwilling to walk — possibly rewalk — the path that leads to romance, rings and relocation, the prospect of a "friend with benefits" is looking less and less like a millennial indulgence.

After all, it gets awfully lonely waiting around for "the one." Perhaps you've decided that what you need at this point in your life is someone to talk to and laugh with — someone with whom you can share the sheets, but not the tax refund.

The beauty of meeting and relating on JWMatch is that you can do this in a safe, anonymous and fun environment.

Whether you are looking for love, making new friends, or finding old friends again, JWMatch is a great way to do just this!

When you’re single and you don’t want to be, the next steps feel pretty obvious. It’s why we stumble when it comes to taking a work-based friendship outside of the office.

There’s the overwhelming sense of failure that comes with openly saying ‘I don’t have enough friends and I’d quite like more.’ That’s why we hesitate when we encounter someone we think is cool, have a lovely chat, and want to ask for their number so we can hang out again.

Then Jehovah God said: "It is not good for the man to continue to be alone.

I am going to make a helper for him, as a complement of him." Genesis JWMatch is a way for Jehovah's Witnesses and interested ones to build loving and trusting friendships that can lead to lasting relationships in the real world.

Marilyn, a 57-year-old single colleague of mine, recently reconnected with someone she had worked with many years ago. "No," Marilyn said with a laugh, "it's better than that: I'm in like with him — and that's exactly where I want to be." She further confided that they planned to make their reunions "a regular thing — if four times a year can be called 'regular.' But I think that's about all I really want." Marilyn's casual approach to maintaining a friendship with benefits typifies the mindset of older folks who have reconciled themselves to having "great fun" even if it's "just one of those things." And episodic pleasure-seeking may be more common than you think: In The Normal Bar, a book I wrote last year with Chrisanna Northrup and James Witte, we reported that 61 percent of female survey respondents who had partners fantasized about someone they had met.

These suggestions are as follows: drop that “faux spouse” who refuses to commit to you; follow the Golden Rule of dating (treating the person you’re dating as you would want someone else to treat your future spouse); don’t date until you are at a place in life where friendship can naturally develop into a flourishing, exclusive relationship; don’t kiss until you’re engaged—or even the day of the wedding; set patterns of faithfulness and self-control that will guide you through dating and marital life; observe how the friend in whom you are interested resolves disagreements, shows forgiveness, and handles disappointments and frustrations; before engagement, address general concerns about previous sexual experience. While “enjoying” the seeming benefits of emotional attachments, unmarried couples— though friends—may be avoiding the hard work of deepened commitment, but to their own harm.

A guy and a girl who aren’t officially dating may send texts to each other during the wee hours of the night, “chat” extensively over Facebook, or “hang out” with each other on their i Phones or i Pads.

It was just me and the sidewalks and subways of Chicago, testing each other out. But I hadn’t considered that parking would be expensive, and I was broke from all those coffee shop cappuccinos.

I ended up crying, driving home and skipping the show.

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